Google TV: Web entering your television this fall

Don’t want to wait until 10 p.m. for your favorite show to run on TV? Tired of having to watch a show online on your tiny computer screen? As announced earlier this week, your solution is coming this fall, and internationally in 2011, with GoogleTV. It is Google’s new effort to seamlessly connect the Web with TV and your TV with the Web. With GoogleTV, people will soon be able to search the endless possibilities of the Internet on their TV home screens. All the content available on the Web and television will be in one place. Genius!

Now I know this may seem too good to be true, but just think about what a great tool Google has created. Want to YouTube your favorite video, political speech, or song? Enter it in the Google search bar at the top of your TV screen and choose from never-ending options. With GoogleTV, you can display photo slideshows, access social media sites, and record and replay your favorite shows over and over. GoogleTV also has a homepage of favorites, similar to a computer, where you can save all your favorite sites, channels, and shows conveniently.

googletvFor public relations practitioners, this can open infinite opportunities to advertising and marketing. GoogleTV will be using Android’s operating systems and plans on using some of its available apps to display advertisements.

“If you already use Google’s AdWords programs for marketing, TV could add new niches to Web marketing and branding,” said Christian Del Monte, a writer for iBlogMarketing. “If you don’t use Google yet for marketing, TV may very well be the best way to start.”

Because advertising opportunities via the television have faded due to DVR and other “fast-forward commercials” features, PR has had a tough time utilizing this platform. But now that GoogleTV has been created, television can again be used as a new outlet for client advertising. According to a New York Times article, currently, Google’s display network online consists of more than one million partner sites, which includes YouTube. These sites will all be available via GoogleTV. And when it becomes available worldwide in 2011, PR will have a whole new audience available at a click of a button.

Google has partnered with Intel, Sony, Logitech and other major companies to launch the feature. Intel hopes to expand its television presence while Sony hopes to boost television sales as the first company to provide “Sony Internet TV.” Here is Google’s press release dated May 2010 for more information on GoogleTV.

So what do you think this new invention can do for PR? Can the television outlet become a solid platform for advertisers again? Or will Web marketing still be best on a computer?

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5 Responses to Google TV: Web entering your television this fall

  1. malauddi says:

    Great to know! New media can change all the platforms of mass communication. All PR people should be technically equipped to cope with the future changes. Online marketing will be more popular in the future which can reduce public attention to TV or print media.

  2. lrstarr says:

    This is an interesting concept. Just as we become accepting of our preference for portable devices, the introduction of Google TV forces us to reassess our convenience values. This product merges our Internet and television needs into a user-friendly package that gives TV new life. Although I do not believe Google TV will cause an increased long-term demand for television commercials, it will provide an additional platform for PR practitioners, advertisers and marketers to address target demographics. The packaging of these conveniences is reflective of the “black box” theory which predicts the eventual merging of everyday media usage into an all-encompassing product. This concept was widely considered unrealistic – but Google TV proves to be a likely precursor to such an invention.

  3. lrstarr says:

    This is an interesting concept. Just as we become accepting of our preference for portable devices, the introduction of Google TV forces us to reassess our convenience values. This product merges our internet and television needs into a user friendly package that gives TV new life.

    Although I do not believe Google TV will cause an increased long term demand for television commercials (apart from that of which is due to initial product hype), it will provide an additional platform for PR practitioners, advertisers and marketers to address target demographics. The packaging of these conveniences is reflective of the “black box” theory; which predicts the eventual merging of everyday media use into an all-encompassing product. This concept was widely been considered unrealistic- but Google TV proves to be a likely precursor to such an invention.

    Leah Starr

  4. clangefe says:

    I think this would be a great thing if it actually works the way they say it will. I don’t have cable and rely solely on the Internet for watching TV shows currently and would love to have one place to watch everything.

    This provides a great opportunity for the PR world to find a new way to get their message heard. They need to find a creative way to integrate ads and products without antagonizing the viewer and ruining a good thing.

    It will be interesting to see how all of this develops and what ideas come from it.

  5. mwilson9 says:

    I started off giving Google praises for coming up with another great way to engage its audience and bringing its viewer to a new height. Then suddenly it hit me. What is the difference with Google TV versus hooking up your computer to the big screen for all your viewing pleasures?

    Also, a couple years ago my dad purchased a device called WebTV, which was essentially a small box computer and wireless key board that you could hook up to the TV and browse the Web.

    But I guess when you look at the “brand” Google, then that makes all the difference. Nevertheless, I am looking forward to seeing the impact this will have on PR and marketing.

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